Month: November 2018

30
Nov

Source: The Diplomat

Author: Sally Yozell*

26
Nov

Source: ClientEarth, EJF, Oceana, Our Fish, PEW and WWF

Upcoming discussions in the European Parliament to revise the control regulation will be key for all involved in the fisheries sector, including consumers.

Up to one in five wild-caught fish sold at market is stolen from the sea through illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing. Sales of IUU fishing products are estimated to be worth between $10 and $23.5 billion per year globally.

On 30 May 2018, the European Commission (EC) published a proposal for the revision of the fisheries control system in response to loopholes identified in the current legislation and following the European Court of Auditors’ call for more efforts in European Union fisheries controls. To kick off the revision process that will last two years and involve multiple negotiation processes between the European Parliament, the EU Member States and the EC, a group of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) has issued a list of recommendations on how to ensure a strong future fisheries control system. The NGOs, which include, amongst others, ClientEarth, the Environmental Justice Foundation, Oceana, Our Fish, The Pew Charitable Trusts and WWF, will work with key decision makers and stakeholders in the coming years to ensure that the EU will deliver a robust control system.

Continue reading NGO recommendations on future fisheries control regulation

23
Nov

Source: Oxford Research Group

Author: Jessica Spijkers

The current status of global fisheries is a serious cause for concern. But will states engage in conflict with one another to ensure their continued access to fish?

The status of global fisheries is deeply concerning. Human activities are threatening the wellbeing of the ocean in unprecedented ways. The drivers are well-known: plastic pollution, overfishing, agricultural runoff, toxic pollutants, etc. One of the end results has been a profound impact on wild fish stocks. Commercial fisheries are reaching their capacity at a global scale, and attempts at managing remaining fishery resources in a more sustainable way are undermined in many areas by widespread illegal, unreported, and unregulated (or IUU) fishing. Additionally, climate change is expected to not only lead to a redistribution of resources, as so frequently seems to be the case, primarily from countries in the South to the more industrialised North, but also to an overall drop in the productivity of the oceans.

Continue reading Oceanic Change, Fisheries and Future Interstate Conflict

12
Nov

Source: FAO

Norway has undertaken a self-assessment of flag State performance, using the Food and Agriculture Organization’s (FAO) Voluntary Guidelines for Flag State Performance (VGFSP) as a basis.

The VGFSP provide guidance to strengthen and monitor compliance by flag States with their international duties and obligations regarding the flagging and control of fishing vessels. Paragraphs 6-43 of the VGFSP outline the Performance Assessment Criteria – ranging from fisheries management, registration and records of vessels, fishing authorisations, monitoring, control and surveillance (MCS) and cooperation between flag States and coastal States – against which countries are encouraged to rate the fulfilment of their obligations.

Continue reading Norway undertakes self-assessment of flag State performance

11
Nov

Source: JapanTime

Japan and the United States plan to jointly offer training to maritime authorities of Pacific island nations to help them better crack down on illegal fishing within their exclusive economic zones, a Japanese government source said Saturday.

During a roughly three-week program in Japan, which will begin on Nov. 25, officials from 12 nations, including Palau, the Marshal Islands and Micronesia will learn how the Japan Coast Guard conducts policing and visit related facilities, according to the source.

Continue reading In training program, Japan, U.S. to help Pacific island nations counter illegal fishing