Month: October 2018

31
Oct

Source: Guardian
Author: Sulaimon Salau

Major ocean assets on decline

About eight African countries comprising the Gulf of Guinea (GOG) Commission, yesterday, frowned on underutilisation of the massive ocean assets, even as it decried the continued loss of about $2 billion yearly to illegal/unregulated fishing in the region.

The Gulf of Guinea is made up of the maritime area located in the western part of the Africa. The countries bordering the Atlantic Ocean are: Ghana, Togo, Benin, Nigeria, Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Sao Tome and Principe, Angola, and Congo.

Continue reading GOG nations worried about loss of $2 billion yearly to illegal fishing

26
Oct

Source: Global Fish Watch

Author: Samantha Emmert

Global Fishing Watch and Oceana applaud Peru’s leadership on fisheries transparency

As world leaders prepare to gather in Bali, Indonesia for the fifth-annual Our Ocean conference, Peru has taken bold action to make its national vessel tracking data publicly available for the first time through Global Fishing Watch (GFW). Anyone can now view Peru’s commercial fishing vessels via GFW’s map platform, in near real time, for free.

At least 1,300 of Peru’s industrial fishing vessels, most of which were previously undetected by GFW’s Automatic Identification System (AIS) data, are now visible on the public map. For Peru alone, that is a ten-fold increase in the number of vessels that are now publicly trackable via GFW, which will aid national monitoring and control efforts, including combating Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) fishing.

Continue reading Peru’s Vessel Tracking Data Now Publicly Available Through Global Fishing Watch

24
Oct

Source: EJF

EJF published a new report showing that the global fishing industry suffers from a shocking lack of transparency, allowing Illegal operators to create as much confusion as possible around their identities; escaping detection by changing vessel names; concealing ownership; flying different flags to avoid detection; or removing ships from registers entirely. This report lays out the ‘ten principles for global transparency in the fishing industry’. These simple, low-cost measures – which include publishing license lists and giving vessels unique numbers – are well within the reach of any country and can play a pivotal role in the battle against illegal fishing and human rights abuse in the sector.

Download the full report

 

18
Oct

Source: WWF

Continue reading €12.5 million illegal bluefin tuna trade exposes threat to sustainable fisheries in Europe

17
Oct

Source: EJF, PEW, Oceana, TNC and WWF

The 12th Asia-Europe Meeting and the 9th Republic of Korea-EU bilateral summit, both held this week in Brussels, offer crucial opportunities for Europe and Asia – both giants of the fishing industry – to work together to rebuild global marine resources. Increasing transparency on fishing activity is a vital step to safeguard our oceans to protect the rights of legitimate fishers and communities that rely on them for nutrition and livelihoods. To achieve that, the Environmental Justice Foundation, Oceana, The Pew Charitable Trusts, The Nature Conservancy and WWF are calling for stronger legislation and country leadership to enhance transparency in fisheries management.

Overfishing is still a major threat to the world’s fish stocks, with many on the brink of collapse. 33% of fish stocks are being exploited at unsustainable levels, with a further 60% considered maximally sustainably fished. Illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing only exacerbates these alarming figures and undermines any efforts to manage global fisheries sustainably. It is key that major markets, such as the EU and Asia, or any flag state whose fishing vessels operate in the global oceans, view overfishing and IUU fishing as global challenges that need global solutions.

South Korea is a good example of a country in transition. It has a large distant water fleet that was plagued by allegations of IUU fishing. In response, the country developed and implemented bold policies to monitor and control its vessels. 2015 marked a decisive turning point after which all Korean fishing vessels were required to have vessel tracking devices and strict penalties for serious infringements were introduced. Continue reading Global partners for global challenges: The need for European and Asian fishing nations to prioritise transparency