Europe

26
Nov

Source: ClientEarth, EJF, Oceana, Our Fish, PEW and WWF

Upcoming discussions in the European Parliament to revise the control regulation will be key for all involved in the fisheries sector, including consumers.

Up to one in five wild-caught fish sold at market is stolen from the sea through illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing. Sales of IUU fishing products are estimated to be worth between $10 and $23.5 billion per year globally.

On 30 May 2018, the European Commission (EC) published a proposal for the revision of the fisheries control system in response to loopholes identified in the current legislation and following the European Court of Auditors’ call for more efforts in European Union fisheries controls. To kick off the revision process that will last two years and involve multiple negotiation processes between the European Parliament, the EU Member States and the EC, a group of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) has issued a list of recommendations on how to ensure a strong future fisheries control system. The NGOs, which include, amongst others, ClientEarth, the Environmental Justice Foundation, Oceana, Our Fish, The Pew Charitable Trusts and WWF, will work with key decision makers and stakeholders in the coming years to ensure that the EU will deliver a robust control system.

Continue reading NGO recommendations on future fisheries control regulation

12
Nov

Source: FAO

Norway has undertaken a self-assessment of flag State performance, using the Food and Agriculture Organization’s (FAO) Voluntary Guidelines for Flag State Performance (VGFSP) as a basis.

The VGFSP provide guidance to strengthen and monitor compliance by flag States with their international duties and obligations regarding the flagging and control of fishing vessels. Paragraphs 6-43 of the VGFSP outline the Performance Assessment Criteria – ranging from fisheries management, registration and records of vessels, fishing authorisations, monitoring, control and surveillance (MCS) and cooperation between flag States and coastal States – against which countries are encouraged to rate the fulfilment of their obligations.

Continue reading Norway undertakes self-assessment of flag State performance

18
Oct

Source: WWF

Continue reading €12.5 million illegal bluefin tuna trade exposes threat to sustainable fisheries in Europe

27
Sep

Source: EJF *

The European Commission is currently considering allowing subsidies for the construction of new fishing vessels in the European Union’s outermost regions – the most remote European territories. Such subsidies could drive overfishing, depleting essential marine resources and threatening food security, and there is no evidence that they provide any significant benefits to local communities, a group of NGOs has said.

More than 40 environmental NGOs are urging the European Commission to honour the objectives of the Common Fisheries Policy and not introduce any provisions that would allow for the reintroduction of subsidies for the construction of new fishing vessels.

Overall, 29% of the planet’s fish stocks that have been assessed are now over-fished and 61% are fully exploited, according to the latest report from the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation. Fishing supports the livelihoods of coastal communities around the world, and marine resources are often an essential part of local food security. This is especially true of poorer, developing areas, such as the outermost regions of the EU. Managing these fisheries in a sustainable manner, to ensure that fish stocks remain healthy, is crucial.

Continue reading NGOs criticize European Commission’s proposal for subsidies for new vessels in EU’s outermost regions

17
Sep

Source: MarineLink

An international treaty addressing safety in the fishing industry (the Cape Town Agreement) has been developed and adopted through International Maritime Organization (IMO) but is not yet in force because it lacks sufficient ratification at national level.

As part of a major global effort to encourage ratification and implementation of the Cape Town Agreement, IMO and The Pew Charitable Trusts organised a roundtable event during the Global Fishery Forum in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation (13 September).

IMO’s Cape Town Agreement on fishing vessel safety provides a solid platform for improving fishers’ safety at sea and combating illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing by facilitating better control of fishing vessel safety by flag, port and coastal States. It currently has 10 Contracting States, but needs 22 for entry into force, along with a required number of aggregate fishing vessels.

Continue reading Global Fishery Forum on Fishing Vessel Safety