Global

7
Feb

Source: Global Initiative Against Transnational Organized Crime

The Global Initiative Against Transnational Organized Crime and Poseidon – Aquatic Resource Management Ltd. are pleased to announce the launch of the IUU Fishing Index, a tool designed to provide a better understanding of illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing worldwide.

The IUU Fishing Index has been designed to meet the need for a detailed analysis of fishery countries’ vulnerability, exposure and responses to IUU fishing. It fills a key gap by analyzing and evaluating, state by state, the global implications of IUU fishing, thereby helping policymakers identify where interventions are most needed. 

18
Jan

Source: World Economic Forum

Author: Jim Leape

Largely out of sight, criminals pillage the oceans. They steal millions of tonnes of fish each year. That is a huge economic loss, estimated to be somewhere in the tens of billions of dollars. It is an even larger threat to food security; a billion people depend on fish as their source of protein, and in many of the countries that are most dependent, one fish in three is stolen. Illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing defeats governments’ efforts to manage their resources, and it undercuts the millions of fishers who are playing by the rules.

Continue reading We have the tools to tackle illegal fishing. It’s time to use them

17
Jan

Source: Hakai Magazine

Author: Kimberley Riskas

Bunker vessels are one of the most connected ships at sea; tracking them could pinpoint clusters of illegal fishing.

Fuel tankers may help track down illegal fishing and unravel the criminal networks behind it, according to an Australian study.

Across the world’s oceans, up to US $23-billion is lost annually to illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing, a crime that includes everything from poaching to fishing with dynamite. But IUU fishing is incredibly difficult to monitor and many of the vessels involved in the illicit practice operate far from shore, where surveillance is scant.

Continue reading Fuel Tankers Help Highlight Illegal Fishing Hotspots

24
Oct

Source: EJF

EJF published a new report showing that the global fishing industry suffers from a shocking lack of transparency, allowing Illegal operators to create as much confusion as possible around their identities; escaping detection by changing vessel names; concealing ownership; flying different flags to avoid detection; or removing ships from registers entirely. This report lays out the ‘ten principles for global transparency in the fishing industry’. These simple, low-cost measures – which include publishing license lists and giving vessels unique numbers – are well within the reach of any country and can play a pivotal role in the battle against illegal fishing and human rights abuse in the sector.

Download the full report

 

18
Sep

Source: Undercurrent News

Japan’s Fisheries Research and Education Agency (FRA) will help Global Fishing Watch and the Australian National Center for Ocean Resources and Security (ANCORS) at the University of Wollongong, in New South Wales, with their investigation of illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing.

Following a memorandum of understanding signed on Sept. 3, the groups have agreed to share “relevant open public data and analytical methodologies, including vessel movement data, catch data and satellite imagery; collaborate on relevant research activities, and publish research outcomes to advance international understanding on IUU fishing and its impacts,” according to a press release.

They intend to analyze night-time satellite imagery, the groups say, as squid jigging most often takes place at night, using bright overhead lights to attract the squid. Continue reading New research partnership formed to investigate illegal fishing in North Pacific