IMO Numbers

24 Oct
2018

Source: EJF EJF published a new report showing that the global fishing industry suffers from a shocking lack of transparency, allowing Illegal operators to create as much confusion as possible around their identities; escaping detection by changing vessel names; concealing ownership; flying different flags to avoid detection; or removing ships from registers entirely. This report […]

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17 Sep
2018

Source: MarineLink An international treaty addressing safety in the fishing industry (the Cape Town Agreement) has been developed and adopted through International Maritime Organization (IMO) but is not yet in force because it lacks sufficient ratification at national level. As part of a major global effort to encourage ratification and implementation of the Cape Town […]

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15 Sep
2018

Source: The Economist Illegal, unreported and unregulated. The business of off-the-books ocean fishing, abbreviated to IUU by international organisations, is a big one, worth many billions of dollars a year. Estimates of the annual catch landed beyond the authorities’ notice range from 11m to 26m tonnes. That is on top of an official catch of […]

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6 Nov
2017

Author: Environmental Justice Foundation (EJF) Experts in EU and WTO law have concluded that introducing compulsory identifying numbers for non-EU fishing vessels exporting seafood to the EU is compatible with World Trade Organisation (WTO) rules. In light of this, environmental organisations are calling for the European Commission to reconsider their approach.

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16 Oct
2017

Source: Seafoodsource As the Caribbean continues its fight against illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing, fisheries officials agreed at a meeting last month to harmonize standards for marking authorized fishing vessels, as well as to establish a list of vessels involved in IUU fishing.

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5 Oct
2017

Source: Euractiv Author: Javier Garat and Linnéa Engström The European Commission needs to work out more effective rules to ensure that only fish meeting high social and environmental standards can enter the EU market, as well as a better implementation of the EU control regime in general, argue Linnéa Engström and Javier Garat.

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4 Sep
2017

Source & Author: Port News IMO says, fishing continues to be considered the most hazardous occupation in the world, and despite the improvement in technology, the loss of life in the fisheries sector is unacceptably high.

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