Technology

18
Sep

Source: Undercurrent News

Japan’s Fisheries Research and Education Agency (FRA) will help Global Fishing Watch and the Australian National Center for Ocean Resources and Security (ANCORS) at the University of Wollongong, in New South Wales, with their investigation of illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing.

Following a memorandum of understanding signed on Sept. 3, the groups have agreed to share “relevant open public data and analytical methodologies, including vessel movement data, catch data and satellite imagery; collaborate on relevant research activities, and publish research outcomes to advance international understanding on IUU fishing and its impacts,” according to a press release.

They intend to analyze night-time satellite imagery, the groups say, as squid jigging most often takes place at night, using bright overhead lights to attract the squid. Continue reading New research partnership formed to investigate illegal fishing in North Pacific

15
Sep

Source: The Economist

Illegal, unreported and unregulated. The business of off-the-books ocean fishing, abbreviated to IUU by international organisations, is a big one, worth many billions of dollars a year. Estimates of the annual catch landed beyond the authorities’ notice range from 11m to 26m tonnes. That is on top of an official catch of a bit under 90m tonnes a year. Given the belief of most fisheries scientists that even permitted extractions are doing great damage to marine ecosystems, this is worrying. But policing the oceans is hard, meaning that, more often than not, IUU fishermen get away with it.

This, though, is changing. New ways of watching from space may turn the tables on illicit fishing, heralding an era in which keen eyes follow every fishing boat, all the time. At the least, this will make clear who is turning a blind eye to the IUU brigade. The excuse that “we didn’t know what was going on” will become untenable.

Read the full article

30
Jan

Source: Fish-i-Africa

A new report from the FISH-i Africa Task Force, ‘The Potential Use of AIS as a Fisheries Monitoring Tool’ examines the value of using automatic identification system (AIS) as part of monitoring, control and surveillance (MCS) operations. AISs are very high frequency (VHF) radio-based tools that support safe navigation and collision avoidance by automatically transferring information about the ship to other ships and coastal authorities. More recently AIS has been identified as a useful tool to contribute to fisheries enforcement efforts.

Continue reading FISH-i Africa report on ‘The Potential Use of AIS as a Fisheries Monitoring Tool’ published