Catch documentation schemes

26
Nov

Source: ClientEarth, EJF, Oceana, Our Fish, PEW and WWF

Upcoming discussions in the European Parliament to revise the control regulation will be key for all involved in the fisheries sector, including consumers.

Up to one in five wild-caught fish sold at market is stolen from the sea through illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing. Sales of IUU fishing products are estimated to be worth between $10 and $23.5 billion per year globally.

On 30 May 2018, the European Commission (EC) published a proposal for the revision of the fisheries control system in response to loopholes identified in the current legislation and following the European Court of Auditors’ call for more efforts in European Union fisheries controls. To kick off the revision process that will last two years and involve multiple negotiation processes between the European Parliament, the EU Member States and the EC, a group of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) has issued a list of recommendations on how to ensure a strong future fisheries control system. The NGOs, which include, amongst others, ClientEarth, the Environmental Justice Foundation, Oceana, Our Fish, The Pew Charitable Trusts and WWF, will work with key decision makers and stakeholders in the coming years to ensure that the EU will deliver a robust control system.

Continue reading NGO recommendations on future fisheries control regulation

24
Oct

Source: EJF

EJF published a new report showing that the global fishing industry suffers from a shocking lack of transparency, allowing Illegal operators to create as much confusion as possible around their identities; escaping detection by changing vessel names; concealing ownership; flying different flags to avoid detection; or removing ships from registers entirely. This report lays out the ‘ten principles for global transparency in the fishing industry’. These simple, low-cost measures – which include publishing license lists and giving vessels unique numbers – are well within the reach of any country and can play a pivotal role in the battle against illegal fishing and human rights abuse in the sector.

Download the full report

 

13
Aug

Source: EJF

Ghana has stepped up its efforts to crack down on ‘saiko’ – an illegal practice driving the collapse of Ghana’s inshore fishery, whereby industrial trawlers sell fish to local canoes at sea. Last week, the country’s Fisheries Enforcement Unit intercepted an alleged saiko canoe loaded with tonnes of frozen fish. Suitably deterrent sanctions must follow, say the Environmental Justice Foundation (EJF) and local NGO Hen Mpoano, and they must be imposed not only on the saiko canoe owner, but also the operators and owners of the industrial trawl vessel that caught the fish.

Continue reading Ghana steps up the fight against illegal fishing practices

25
May

Source & Author: EJF/Oceana*

Many fish products sold on the EU market originate from fish caught under poor conditions, from a sustainability, hygiene, safety or labour perspective. Some products can be traced directly to fishing activities that are damaging to the environment or do not respect international social and labour rights; rules that are mandatory for the EU fishing industry. This is problematic on many levels: it creates unfair competition for EU operators; it opens the EU market to supply chains with unsustainable environmental or poor labour practices; and it is runs contrary to the EU’s commitment to improve international fisheries governance and to pursue a responsible trade policy as an instrument for the implementation of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. But things can be changed: on 30 May 2018, the European Parliament will vote on a motion for a resolution initiated by the Member of European Parliament (MEP) Linnéa Engström, concerning the implementation of control measures for establishing the conformity of fisheries products with access criteria to the EU market. Continue reading European Parliament to vote on Resolution calling for an improved control regime of fisheries products and level playing field in EU seafood trade

5
Feb

Source: EJF, Oceana, The Pew Charitable Trusts and WWF
Author: Victoria Mundy

How has the EU action against illegal fishing changed our seafood trade flows? And what do these trade patterns tell us?

Ten years after the adoption of the EU IUU Regulation, a new report examines how the EU’s carding system has impacted the flow of seafood products into and within the EU. Continue reading New report: The impact of the EU IUU Regulation on seafood trade flows